Zika testing and viral transmission

Dear Puerto Rico Ob Gyn’s:

Please remember to discuss Zika testing and viral transmission with all your reproductive age patients and most importantly with those PREGNANT. See attached key points to remember and educational material from CDC.

Let’s PROTECT those most vulnerable: our PREGNANT WOMEN and their FETUSES.

Thank you all,

Nabal

 

Are you pregnant? Here’s what you can do if you live in an area with Zika

1. See a doctor or other healthcare provider

  • You are at risk of getting Zika throughout your pregnancy. For this reason, doctors or other healthcare providers can offer testing at the first prenatal visit and a second test in the second trimester.
  • If you have symptoms of Zika (fever, rash, joint pain, or conjunctivitis (red eyes)) at any time during your pregnancy, you should be tested for Zika. A doctor or other healthcare provider may also test for other similar diseases, like dengue or chikungunya.
  • CDC has guidance to help doctors decide what tests are needed for pregnant women who may have been exposed to Zika.

2. There is no vaccine or medicine for Zika. The best way to prevent Zika is to prevent mosquito bites.

  • Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
  • Stay in places with air conditioning and window and door screens to keep mosquitoes outside.
  • Use Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellents. When used as directed, these insect repellents are proven safe and effective even for pregnant and breastfeeding women.
  • Remove or stay away from mosquito breeding sites, like containers with standing water.

3. Take steps to prevent getting Zika through sex

  • Until more is known, pregnant women with male sex partners who live in or travel to an area with Zika should use a condom(http://www.cdc.gov/condomeffectiveness/brief.html) every time they have sex or not have sex during the pregnancy. To be effective, condoms must be used correctly (warning: this link contains sexually graphic images) from start to finish, every time during sex. This includes vaginal, anal, or oral (mouth-to-penis) sex.
  • If a pregnant woman is concerned that her male partner may have or had a Zika virus infection, she should talk to her doctor or other healthcare provider

Click the following images, to download the key points in PDF:

CDC’s Response to Zika PREGNANT and living in an area with Zik Lista de control para usar en la consulta médica como respuesta CDCZikaSex NEJM_Zika_and_birth_defects_causality Zika_in_PR_MMWR_April_29_2016

 

Nabal Jose Bracero, M.D., F.A.C.O.G.
Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility

Medical Director
GENES fertility institute
San Juan, Puerto Rico
www.genesfertility.com

Assistant Professor
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine

President & Founder
PROGyn
www.progyn.org

Chairman
American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
Puerto Rico Section

Administrative Order 348 regarding management of Zika virus infection in pregnancy

Dear Colleagues and Women Health Care Providers:

Please see attached two important documents:

  1. Administrative Order 348 regarding management of Zika virus infection in pregnancy.
  2. Invitation to the Zika and Pregnancy Update Symposium NEXT Thursday 2/18/16 at the Theater of the InterAmerican University Law School in Hato Rey.

During the last 3-4 weeks, we have been in close collaboration both with the Puerto Rico Department of Health and with the CDC Staff of the Zika Virus Emergency Response Team and the Dengue Branch, putting together coherent guidelines for the management of pregnant patients and the potential threat of a Zika virus outbreak.

Please, review these documents and bring your questions to the Zyka and Pregnancy Symposium on February 18th. For more information please access www.progyn.org

 

Respectfully,

Nabal

Nabal Jose Bracero, M.D., F.A.C.O.G.
Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility

Chairman
American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
Puerto Rico Section

Medical Director
GENES fertility institute
San Juan, Puerto Rico
www.genesfertility.com

Assistant Professor
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine

President & Founder
PROGyn Foundation
www.progyn.org

 


 

Haga click en las siguientes imagenes para ampliar documentos

Orden_Administrativa_Zika

Print

Alerta sobre el virus del Zika

Estimado colega Obstetra Ginecólogo:

El virus del Zika presenta un potencial riesgo serio para nuestras pacientes embarazadas y sus hijos por nacer.  Hasta el momento las siguientes autoridades y organizaciones han emitido boletines de alerta y vigilancia ante la posible asociación de este virus con microcefalia fetal y otros desordenes neurológicos:

World Health Organization/Pan-American Health Organization (WHO/PAHO), Center for Disease Control (CDC), American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) y el Department de Salud de Puerto Rico.

En estos momentos, estamos en activa colaboración entre todos estos grupos con dos objetivos:

  1. Preparar un protocolo uniforme para manejo de embarazadas a riesgo de infección viral con Zika.
  2. Investigar y corroborar la asociación sugerida entre el Zika y la microcefalia a partir del aumento desproporcionado de estos casos en el noreste de Brasil.

Tan pronto tengamos protocolos para ejecución los divulgaremos. Por lo pronto, la recomendación más importante es educar la embarazada en la prevención de la picadura de mosquito y evaluar prontamente la paciente embarazada con cuadro viral y enviar la prueba de laboratorio “Triopex” que permite discernir entre dengue, chinkungunya y zika.

Finalmente, por favor promueve la vacunación de la paciente embarazada contra la influenza de temporada. De esta forma podremos manejar más eficientemente cualquier cuadro viral de nuestras embarazadas.

Les incluyo material educativo del CDC para las oficinas y las pacientes y dos artículos importantes del tema.

 

NEJM_Zika_Virus_in_the_Americas Zika virus intrauterine infection causes fetal brain abnormality

Virus del Zika: Lo que usted necesita saber

Mosquitoes spread chikungunya, dengue, and Zika viruses.

Mosquitoes spread chikungunya, dengue, and Zika viruses.

 

Nabal Jose Bracero, M.D., F.A.C.O.G.

Chairman
American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
Puerto Rico Section

President & Founder
PROGyn Foundation
www.progyn.org

Assistant Professor
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine

Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility

Medical Director
GENES fertility institute
San Juan, Puerto Rico
www.genesfertility.com